worklog

Feb. 24th, 2017 10:07 pm
artsyhonker: a girl with glasses and purple shoulder-length hair (Default)
[personal profile] artsyhonker
Went to a lunchtime concert, to hear new music by a colleague, and a Beethoven piano trio.

I liked the new music, but having heard it only once I can't write much about it.

The Beethoven was Op. 1 No. 3 in C minor, which I thought I didn't know but which was somewhat familiar. The pianist was seriously struggling with some of the scale passages, I felt bad for him and wondered if he had an injury, or just misjudged his practice. The piano in that space isn't amazing anyway. There were some flat entries by the violin. The 'cello was good. Overall, a spirited performance, but there were definitely bits where the three players were making something greater than the sum of its parts, and bits where they were playing the notes in order to get through that bit.

Went for a walk. Definitely getting lurgy. Walked further than I should have, but I think staring at the sea did me some good, mentally. Trying not to beat myself up about the "lost" time. Sometimes creative work requires staring at the sea.

Did #choralhour on Twitter. Found out my Magnificat might be sung by a choir in Edinburgh in April. Made contact with an Anglican choir in Berlin.

May have found a text for the Juice piece; someone suggested I set The New Colossus. This is appropriate, and topical, and I could also use it for the Choirs Against Racism project.

Together. As we do with all things.

Feb. 24th, 2017 06:05 am
azurelunatic: AO3 rating glyph: Explicit, Multi-relationships, choose not to warn, unfinished.  (how is this my life)
[personal profile] azurelunatic
There are a few resonant phrases in this relationship. Some are endearments and other such private things.

There are two that occupy adjacent spaces.

"As long as we both want it."
That's our time commitment. If both of us no longer want the relationship, it's time to work on dismantling it with the same consideration and love we put into constructing it. If so many as one of us no longer wants it, it's time to end it.

And as long as we both do want it, that means putting in the work. Being present. Taking care. Tackling the problems that pop up.

And there will be problems. But we don't have to face them alone anymore.

"Together. As we do with all things."

Even when we still have to do a specific part alone, the principle stays with us. The hard things are a little less hard with someone holding your hand.

QotD

Feb. 24th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"Myth: Racism declines as time passes
 Reality: Racism fluidly adjusts to prevailing political and economic interests"

  -- Khaled Beydoun, 2017-02-16

artsyhonker: a girl with glasses and purple shoulder-length hair (Default)
[personal profile] artsyhonker
Today was the first of two "Postgraduate Research Induction" sessions at the University of Aberdeen.

The morning included a lot of talking from the Dean of Graduate Studies, and some talking from a number of others -- the library services, careers services, and so on.

There was a "networking bingo" game which is a sort of specially-designed hell for introverts where we had to talk to people to find out if they had attributes printed in the squares. It was, in fairness, a lot better than just being encouraged to talk to people without that kind of structure, but there wasn't really enough time to get to know anyone properly and also fill in the sheet.

There was nothing at all on how to do a research PhD that's actually a portfolio of your own artistic work and an accompanying dissertation, nor did I meet anyone else who's doing that. So I feel like I used 4 hours of concentration for something that was actually pretty low-value for me. But at least I'm writing about my work more, now, and reading other people's thoughts about contemporary music, and even doing some listening (not much yet, but give it time).

I ran some errands and had some lunch, then came back and listened to Kyle Randall's New Gothic Mass, which I wasn't desperately impressed by, though I'll listen again when I'm less tired.

And I've transferred over my bulletjournal, finally, not having managed to get around to it last night after all.

Croydon Fun Weekend 2018

Feb. 23rd, 2017 04:43 pm
nou: The word "kake" in a white monospaced font on a black background (Default)
[personal profile] nou

Just a quick heads-up that, after a year off in 2017, the Croydon Fun Weekend will be back in 2018, running from Friday 26 January to Sunday 28 January.

I’ll provide more details closer to the time; but in the meantime, if you’re interested in helping to organise the weekend or in running any sessions, please let me know! For an idea of the sort of things that might be included, see programmes from previous years: 2014, 2015, 2016.

QotD

Feb. 23rd, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"He said he had all the best words, he didn't say he knew how to use them. Maybe, when he bought them, they didn't come with instructions." -- Brautigan, Lawyers, Guns, and Money, comments [thanks to [info] realinterrobang for quoting this earlier]

"It's so hard to say goodbye"

Feb. 23rd, 2017 01:17 am
rosefox: An adorable white toddler wearing an adult's grey flatcap (kit)
[personal profile] rosefox
Kit's developing some separation anxiety (yes, only now, at nearly 14 months!) and started crying tonight when we began the bedtime routine because bedtime means saying goodnight and everyone going away. We still did what we always do: big family hug, two parents say night-night and leave, and the third reads stories and provides cuddles and puts the baby in the crib. They clung to all of us during goodnight hugs, glumly (and sleepily) submitted to storytime, and finally fell asleep after only a little more fussing. Then we all sat around feeling heartbroken because it is so hard to see the baby so sad.

Tonight's bedtime story was No Matter What, by sheer coincidence; I spotted it while Kit was demolishing their bookshelf (a favorite activity) and realized we hadn't read it in ages. I'm never sure how much Kit understands of the actual words we say, but I think the meaning was clear, especially with the way I kept kissing and hugging them as I read. And I think it helped.

They've started getting upset when books end, too. We always have to open the book again to reassure them that the story is still there and they can reread it whenever they want. Sometimes they flip through it to find a favorite page before reluctantly accepting that the book is done. When we let them turn pages, they turn them really fast, without waiting for us to finish reading any text; one long look at the images on the page and then it's on to the next. It's so very like the way I blaze through books and then feel disappointed when they're done that it makes me laugh every time.

Kit endured their first ear infection this week, poor thing, and has been taking amoxicillin for it. As soon as they started on the antibiotics, their fever went away entirely and their vigor and appetite returned. (Their first full day of betterness ended with them not being able to fall asleep until 11 p.m. because all the energy they'd lacked while ill came roaring back with a vengeance. Fortunately that was a one-time thing and they're back on their usual sleep schedule.) I'm so glad for our access to good medical care, and also extremely glad to have a baby who sucks obediently on medication syringes, even when they hate the taste of the medicine, and doesn't appear to have allergies to anything. We were all very relieved that they went back to daycare today, because five days in a row of sick (and then recovering) baby at home was very challenging for all of us, especially as we were dealing with another family crisis at the same time. As always, I have no idea how single and stay-at-home parents do it. No idea whatsoever.

We're all quite convinced that Kit has psychic powers that only activate when they're asleep. Whenever X goes to bed—which doesn't happen at the same time every night—Kit sleep-fusses just enough to set off the monitor. Just now I returned to writing this entry after a while of doing other things, and Kit promptly made a few tiny noises. So I'm thinking at them as hard as I can: See, silly baby, I told you that we think of you even when you're not right in front of us. Rest now. No one is too far away, and we'll always be there when you need us.
jack: (Default)
[personal profile] jack
I was reflecting further on my previous comments on meta-history in source control.

One use case I imagined was that you can rebase freely, and people who've pulled will have everything just work assuming they always pull rebase. But I may have been too pessimistic. A normal pull rebase may usually just cope with the sort of rebasing people are likely to have done upstream anyway.

The other question is, are you losing old history by rebasing older commits? Well, I don't suggest doing it for very old commits, but I guess, you're not losing any history for commits that were in releases.

Although that itself raises a reason to have a connection between the new branch and the old: you shouldn't be rebasing history prior to a release much (usually not at all. maybe to squash a commit to make git bisect work?) But if you do, you don't want too parallel branches with the same commit, you want to be able to see where the release was on the "good" history (assuming there's a commit which is file-identical to the original release commit), and fall back to the "original" history only if there's some problem.

And as I've said before, another thing I like is the idea that if you're rebasing, you don't have a command that says "do this whole magic thing in one step", you have a thing that says "construct a new branch one commit at a time from this existing branch, stopping when there's a problem", and there is no state needed to continue after resolving a problem, you just re-run the command on the partially-constructed new branch. And then can choose to throw away the old branch to tidy up, but that's not an inherent part of the commadn.

worklog

Feb. 22nd, 2017 06:27 pm
artsyhonker: a girl with glasses and purple shoulder-length hair (Default)
[personal profile] artsyhonker
Yesterday: packing, mostly, which involved lots of laundry and turning the radiators on specially to dry it. But in between that I found some poetry to add to Words for Songs, and another modern poet whose feed to follow. So there's that. I also found some bits and pieces to listen to on Bandcamp.

I think some of the issue for me with getting my academic reading and listening done is that I don't have regular, routine reading or listening times *at all*. So turning this DW account into a place that I do at least some of the reading, and trying to figure out how listening fits into a schedule, is a good thing. Academic research-like reading is going to be different than reading poetry on the internet, but just doing some work-related reading each day is stil better than nothing. Ideally, if I want these changes to stick, they're going to have to be organic and habitual, rather than attempting to do an immediate complete overhaul of my routines. And ideally, I do wnat these changes to stick beyond the PhD. Not reading enough poetry is the main reason I so often struggle to find the right words for a composition; not reading enough of the researchy, theoretical stuff is less obviously limiting, but being able to do self-directed intellectual study at a higher level than "hey, that book looks interesting" or "Oh crap I need to know about widgets, what does the internet say about them?" is going to serve me well no matter what I do. (The practical skills side of this I can already self-direct to an extent I'm fairly happy with, but it's a while since I pushed myself in the arena of learning information.)

Today I spent on the train to Aberdeen. I was going to transfer over to a new bullet journal but the train was too bumpy, and I was not concentrating well. So I mostly spent the journey reading non-PhD stuff, nodding off, and staring at the sea.

Going to have some supper, unpack, and then see how much of the BuJo transfer I can do before bed, and try to figure out what tomorrow's schedule is like -- it's some kind of postgraduate induction thing, with a lot of emphasis on experimental ethics committees. I think there's a concert in the evening, too.

It would be sensible for me to make a post here with things like the regular times of services at St Andrew's Episcopal, opening hours for various restaurants, and so on; I tend to forget while I'm away and no longer need the information, and as I'm currently getting through a bullet journal every 3 months (I have a lot of ideas, okay?), and it's the sort of thing that's useful to have but not crucial to have offline, it's more sensible to store some of that stuff in a bookmark.

QotD

Feb. 22nd, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"The bosom of America is open to receive not only the opulent & respectable Stranger, but the oppressed & persecuted of all Nations & Religions; whom we shall wellcome to a participation of all our rights & previleges, if by decency & propriety of conduct they appear to merit the enjoyment." -- George Washington (b. 1732-02-22[*], d. 1799-12-14; President of the US 1789-1797), 1783-12-02, letter to Joshua Holmes, often cited as "Letter To the Members of the volunteer Associations & other Inhabitants of the Kingdom of Ireland who have lately arrived in the City of New York."

[*] Recorded as 11 Feb. 1731-32 in the Julian calendar, which England and her colonies used at that time; retconned to the equivalent Gregorian date, 22 Feb. 1732, when the Gregorian calendar was adopted in 1752. See a calendar for September 1752 for the changeover (on a Unix/Linux computer, type "cal 9 1752"). Note that different countries adopted the Gregorian calendar in different years.

Piano

Feb. 21st, 2017 10:34 am
wildeabandon: photo of me with wavy hair and gold lipstick (Default)
[personal profile] wildeabandon
I’ve been learning the piano again, and it’s giving me a great deal of pleasure. I learned for a few years as a child, but gave up when it started getting difficult, and in the last five years or so I’ve periodically gone “I should learn to play again”, made enthusiastic attempts for a couple of weeks, and then gotten bored. About a year ago, when we were preparing for a couple of singthroughs at Ardgour-en-France, I volunteered to do the easy piano version accompaniment for a couple of the songs. It took a ridiculous amount of time to get these really quite simple pieces to a non-terrible standard, but it got me back into the habit of playing regularly again, and I’ve carried on ever since.

When I moved out to Northampton I had quite a lot of time to myself, so after a little while decided to treat myself to a cheap spare piano out here, and since then I’ve been playing a lot more, and recently started taking lessons again. I’m not someone who’s naturally musically talented, but it turns out that actually practicing a reasonable amount means you get better at a reasonable rate. Who knew? I’m preparing for my grade 5 now, and having a lot of fun with the pieces (not so much fun with the scales, of which there are many, but I do seem to find it easier to be disciplined about them than I did as a youngster).

QotD

Feb. 21st, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"For me, the end of childhood came when the number of candles on my birthday cake no longer reflected my age, around 19 or 20. From then on, each candle came to represent an entire decade." -- Yotam Ottolenghi

worklog: blogging

Feb. 20th, 2017 11:26 pm
artsyhonker: a girl with glasses and purple shoulder-length hair (Default)
[personal profile] artsyhonker
Made a blog post that is both a quotidian update of the week, and delves into my feelings aorund #1daywithoutus a bit.

Very tired now.

worklog: yakshaving

Feb. 20th, 2017 09:27 pm
artsyhonker: a girl with glasses and purple shoulder-length hair (Default)
[personal profile] artsyhonker
Not much work today; partly because I was sortof avoiding it because of #1daywithoutus, and partly because I'm very tired.

I did finally add a user icon here, and found some more people to follow who are interested in choral music. I'm... not entirely sure where I'm going with the social networking? This all feels much smaller than Livejournal was in its heyday, but maybe that's a good thing. Anyway, if you're new here, hello, and welcome, and stuff.

I was going to post something on my blog about being an immigrant, but I didn't really know what to write. I might have one more try at it, as I also need to do my weekly summary update.

Thinking about also posting a weekly link roundup. Here? There? Probably there.

The writing here is to catch my thoughts, take PhD-related notes, and get used to writing about my work at a variety of different levels. I'm not locking most of it. If I'm going to write a dissertation as well as compose a portfolio, I need to be in the habit of stringing more than 140 characters together on the regular.

The writing at my blog is much more about things that will be interesting to people who like or are interested my choral music but don't necessarily care much about the academic processes (or my struggles with them), don't want to see a zillion half-baked ideas, aren't necessarily interested in the nuts and bolts. It's public-facing. But it should probably still have some personality, so a link roundup that is partly social justice, partly music-related, partly church-related, is probably good, as long as it isn't too spammy. (One of the ways to make it not seem so spammy, of course, is to cross-pollinate links from DW which don't necessarily make it on to Twitter and the Book of Face.)

If you want to follow both I'm pretty sure there's a feed thing somewhere here. Ah, yes: [syndicated profile] artsyhonker_blog_feed is it.
artsyhonker: a girl with glasses and purple shoulder-length hair (Default)
[personal profile] artsyhonker
So there is Hiveworks, which is a creator-owned comic collective; it looks like there revenue comes from advertising, and they have various mentoring services and so on.

Could something similar work with sheet music publishing?

When I've spoken to traditional publishers, they've generally not been willing to talk about the Creative Commons thing. From their perspective, publishing something that people are allowed to photocopy, and could even reproduce themselves by downloading the work from online, is no way to make a living.

I think this is a misunderstanding of the market for deadtree format sheet music:

1) When I am performing regularly, I frequently buy scores that are in the public domain, because printing things at home is annoying or inconvenient or, in the end, not much cheaper.

2) There are still a number of people who only really buy sheet music by post or in actual shops; while this is a shrinking market, the problems of e-scores (readers are expensive and run out of battery; you can't write on electronic scores anywhere near as easily as you can paper ones with a pencil, or draw pictures of the conductor with a dragon's head for that matter; nobody has really got page turns right; DRM of any kind at all is really annoying if you're buying a piece of music thinking your choir might sing it again in 5 or 10 years) are not really going away quickly yet, and in the meantime, fewer people who own computers have access to a printer at home.

3) In terms of choral music, at least, you can charge a bit more for a "photocopiable resource": I've seen some publishers experimenting with this with the Christian Copyright Licensing Initiative. (The difference between that and CC by-SA? CC by-SA requires no admin on the part of the consumer, and rather less on the part of the composer, too. CCLI is an awkward workaround, and it shows.)

Further, when people go to download music from e.g. the Choral Public Domain Library or IMSLP, they're usually looking for something they already know to be in the public domain. When they go to a bricks-and-mortar or even an online sheet music shop, they're looking for new stuff. My work is new -- but it's on CPDL. Oh, and Lulu, which also isn't somewhere people go to look for sheet music.

Just as e-books have not, in fact, meant that people stop buying deadtree format books, I don't think electronic scores are going to kill the deadtree format music library just yet.

I think it's also a misunderstanding of the nature of copyright and copyright infringement. In general, if someone is going to photocopy my music, they're going to do it anyway, and sortof hope they don't get caught.

Anyway, I am wondering whether some kind of collectively-owned publishing house which explicitly allows composers to choose Creative Commons licenses -- or not, if the composer in question would rather not -- would be a good idea.

I suppose this is just more fleshing out of this idea about a print-on-demand music publisher. The difference between that and this? Collective ownership, and a presence (in due course) in bricks-and-mortar sheet music shops where they exist. (I don't think most of the existing small sheet music publishers do print-on-demand -- I think they do a bulk order from a music reprographics company, and then warehouse it and distribute. I know of one print-on-demand music reprographics company that also does distribution, which isn't cheap, but a co-op might be a good way to manage the cost.)

The thing about print-on-demand is that without the warehousing costs, and with distribution being outsourced, you don't necessarily have to play the crappy gatekeeping game of only having a certain "standard" of composer, either (and very often this is more about an old boys' network and the perceived necessity of going for a certain style, than anything else). You can still have the equivalent of whoever it is that decides to send a catalogue showcasing certain repertoire to the brick-and-mortar shops, print that when they order it, and also have ten thousand "long tail" pieces of music that only get printed when someone requests them -- only now, they can request them from brick-and-mortar shops, too. Further, if you have a decent online shop with decent search engine optimisation etc, you can use the sales figures from that to predict what to send to the brick-and-mortar shops; and since it's a composer-owned co-op you can also ask composers to give you some of their social media stats etc (strictly on an opt-in basis, of course) and add some of the more popular ones there to the deadtree catalogue, so that people like me who are mostly focused on free downloads and Patreon can still have offline representation.

I do think hybrid models like this are a way that the publishing industry can stop eating itself, and that artist ownership is likely to be beneficial. However, I do not know how to get there from here, I don't even know many other composers who use CC by-SA, and I'm supposed to be doing a PhD, not starting companies.
simont: (Default)
[personal profile] simont

Over the weekend, I realised, extremely belatedly, that the expression language I designed for my free-software project spigot has a grammar bug. Specifically, it's a context-dependency analogous to the C typedef bug: the same expression can parse differently depending on whether a given identifier is currently defined to be a function or a variable, which means that you need to do your scope analysis in sync with the parse, so that you can know what set of definitions is currently in scope for the subexpression you're currently looking at.

confessions, lamentations, and parser theory )

QotD

Feb. 20th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"One day I want to read a headline that says 'Disabled person overcomes society's crap!' instead of all this overcoming disability nonsense!" -- Gregg Beratan, 2017-02-17

"IT ME"

Feb. 20th, 2017 12:47 am
rosefox: "You mean the girls were topless the whole time and I never noticed?" (oblivious)
[personal profile] rosefox
Thanks to a link from [twitter.com profile] tgstonebutch, today I learned about queerplatonic relationships (a term coined in 2010 by [personal profile] kaz and [personal profile] meloukhia) and spent several hours going "WHY DID NO ONE TELL ME THERE'S A NAME FOR WHAT I DO". A good primer is here and a post on QP not being "romance-lite" is here. I want to quote both of them at length. I want to hug them. This is amazing.

I'm not aro or ace. But there is absolutely a third category of relationship in my life, in addition to partnership and friendship. I've been calling it "partner-level friends" or "my [name]" because I didn't have a word for it. And now I do. Wow. I haven't felt this seen since I read the relationship anarchy manifesto. (Which is very relevant.)

While discussing this with a friend, he asked how "romantic" was being defined, since both "aromantic" and "platonic" were being defined in opposition to it, and I realized I didn't have a good answer. (Merriam-Webster doesn't either. Their definition of "romantic" points to "romance", which points to "love affair", which points back to "romantic".) After some discussion on Twitter, [twitter.com profile] numbathyal pointed me to this piece by a possible aromantic who asked a romantic to define romance. The definition that came out of their conversation was: "Romance is a natural high that occurs in the presence of certain people, without obvious connection to sexuality, 'good company', or emotional intimacy." That jibes pretty well with my experience, which I described as follows:
When I look at people I'm in love with, my body responds. My heart swells—that's literally a feeling I get in my chest, not a metaphor. My heart rate goes up and I feel a little breathless. My pupils probably dilate. I want to be physically touching the person in some way. I'm SUPER touchy-feely with X and J. Constant small touches as I walk past them. Always sitting as near as I can get.

When I look at people I'm in QP relationships with, I have a different set of reactions. Hardly any physical reaction at all. I do like hugging them, but I don't feel the same urge to be in contact. I get much more of a squee reaction. My brain lights up. It's still something I would call chemistry, but a different kind of chemical reaction.

Things romantic and QP relationships have in common for me: I feel a profound sense of safety. I can relax around the person. I say "I love you" and it's never by rote. I want regular communication of some sort. I feel more myself in the person's company.

All of this is shaped by my tendency toward feeling very definitely like I "click" with certain people. Often upon meeting them. A little alert box pops up that says "You and this person could have something amazing together! Pursue it!". I can tell you the exact moment that happened with both X and J, and with all four of my QP people. So I don't know what "romantic" looks like for people who don't have that zing or sniff test or instalove or whatever you want to call it. I spent literal months knowing I was going to fall in love with J and waiting for it to happen. Had to WD40 the "in love" switch. But it finally flipped hard and has never flipped back. <3

This is also not what my romantic relationships looked like when I was in my teens or 20s. Much healthier now. :) Twenty years ago, desperate longing to be loved and valued was part and parcel of romance for me. Now I love myself.
Some of the useful links that came up in conversation (h/t [twitter.com profile] tgstonebutch and [twitter.com profile] numbathyal):

Sexuality and romance as pet elephants that are invisible to ace and aro people
Limerence and "platonic attraction"
How to write about queerplatonic relationships in fiction (lots and lots of useful links there)
Various concepts of greyromanticism

I was amused to choose "oblivious" as the userpic keyword and have this userpic come up, because at first it seemed totally inappropriate for a post discussing nonsexual relationships. In its original context (Sluggy Freelance, if anyone remembers it), it's being said by a guy who is very into topless women and sad that he missed a chance to ogle some. But I've always used it because I am genuinely the sort of person to not really notice that an attractive woman is topless, because we're too busy talking about other things and connecting on other levels. So maybe it's appropriate after all.

QotD

Feb. 19th, 2017 05:24 am
dglenn: Me in kilt and poofy shirt, facing away, playing acoustic guitar behind head (Default)
[personal profile] dglenn

"It didn't matter, back then, that most of us were US citizens and had never even been to Japan. We were presumed guilty, and held without charge for four years, simply because we happened to look like the people who had bombed Pearl Harbor. For that crime, we lost our homes, our livelihoods and our freedoms.

[...]

"I cannot help but hear in [talk of a Muslim registry today] terrible echoes from the past. The internment happened because of three things: fear, prejudice and a failure of political leadership. When the administration targets groups today, whether for exclusion from travel here on the basis of religion and national origin, or for deportation based on their undocumented status, I know from personal experience that these are not done, as they claim, truly in the name of national security.

"No, instead they are intended to strike fear into communities, to show the muscle and 'toughness' of a new president, and to divide the citizenry against itself. These are the acts of a despot, not an elected leader.

"I have dedicated my life to standing against our nation's impulse toward demagoguery and tyranny by the whipped-up masses. The answer lies not just in education, but in empathy. The false narrative -- that there are those who belong here and those who do not -- is designed precisely to divorce us from the truth that we are all here and in this together."

-- George Takei (b. 1937-04-20) "On this Remembrance Day, I hear terrible echoes of the past", 2017-02-18 [bold emphasis added]

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